Nota del "Center for Universal Education" della "Brookings Institution" , Washington D.C. USA

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Economia globale e sviluppo

Around the world, there have been major gains in primary school enrollment, but students in many countries are spending years in school without learning core competencies. In this brief, Jacques van der Gaag and Anda Adams provide an overview of the global learning crisis and make policy recommendations for the global community and national governments to focus on the crucial knowledge acquisition and skills development of education.

Where is the Learning?
Measuring Schooling Efforts
in Developing Countries


Jacques van der Gaag
Senior Fellow, Center for Universal Education
The Brookings Institution
Anda Adams
Associate Director, Center for Universal Education
The Brookings Institution

November 2010

Policy Brief, Brookings Institution, 2010-04 [1]

 

 

 

Introduction

Achieving universal education is a twofold challenge: to get children and youth into school and then to teach them something meaningful while they are there. While important progress has been made on the first challenge, there is a crisis unfolding in relation to learning. Around the world, there have been major gains in primary school enrollment partly due to the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals and the abolition of school fees by many national governments. However in many countries, students are spending years in school without learning core competencies, such as reading and writing. To address this learning crisis, the global community and national governments need to place a much greater focus on the ultimate objective of education—to
acquire knowledge and develop skills.

This shift in focus away from just enrollment to enrollment plus quality learning requires measuring learning outcomes. However, the global education community is not yet systematically using effective instruments for measuring primary school learning in low- and middle-income countries. This policy brief reviews the global efforts among the primary donors to support the measurement of learning outcomes. It then suggests steps needed to transition global education policy into a new paradigm of enrollment plus quality learning, which includes: scaling up the implementation of national education accounts and national assessment systems; increasing attention to monitoring early learning during child development to improve readiness for school; and expanding the systematic use of simple assessments of basic cognitive functions in the early grades to help teachers improve their practice.

Some results

Yet learning outcomes data from numerous countries show children in school are failing to acquire the most basic of skills. For example, 9 out of 10 grade 2 students in Mali studying in French could not read a single word of connected text. In Kenya, 14 percent of grade 3 students were non-readers in English. In two regions in Uganda, 70 percent of grade 2 students could not read a single word in English and over 80 percent could not read in Lango. Roughly half of these grade 3 students in Uganda were unable to read one word in their respective
languages
. [2]

[1] Brief attached

[2] Gove, A. and Cvelich, P. (2010). Early Reading: Igniting Education for All. A report by the Early Grade Learning Community of Practice. Research Triangle Park, NC: Research Triangle Institute.

Les documents de l'article

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pdf_11_education_development_vandergaag.pdf